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What crimes have folks been arrested for in Ripley and Franklin counties during the past six weeks?

Only one extremely violent crime was listed at https://public.courts.in.gov/mycase, the Odyssey case management system used by Indiana courts.

It was the worst one, murder, which doesn’t have a felony level. Nickalas Kedrowitz, 15, formerly of Osgood, was waived into adult court after lengthy court proceedings and showed up in this listing for the first time Sept. 3. He is accused of killing two toddlers living at his home, Desiree McCartney, 2, Kedrowitz’s half sister; and Nathaniel Ritz, 11 months, no relation, who died May 6 and July 21, 2017, when he was 13.

Other persons were hurt, but not killed in the county, causing their perpetrators to be charged with Level 6 felonies: domestic battery committed in the presence of a child less than 16, four; domestic battery resulting in moderate bodily injury, and neglect of a dependent, two each; strangulation, and battery against a public safety official, one each; and misdemeanors: Class A: domestic battery, two; Class B: disorderly conduct (fighting), four; battery, two; battery by bodily waste, one.

No surprise here: A good portion of the crimes were drug related.

A variety of drug crimes were the reason 69 out of 136 – 50.7 percent were detained with criminal charges during that time period in Ripley County, according to Odyssey.

By far, the drugs of choice were not opioids. Methamphetamine got the most in trouble with 18 possessing it (two between 5 and 10 grams, Level 4 felonies; and 16 with lesser amounts, split evenly between Level 5 and 6 felonies). Eleven were arrested for possession of marijuana, Class B misdemeanors.

The rest of the drug crimes in Ripley County: Level 2: dealing in methamphetamine 10 or more grams, one; Level 5: trafficking with an inmate (controlled substance), four; possession of a narcotic drug (less than 5 grams), three; dealing in a narcotic drug, one; Level 6: unlawful possession of syringe, three; dealing in a narcotic drug, unlawful possession or use of a legend drug, legend drug deception, and possession of a narcotic drug, two each; dealing in a Schedule I controlled substance, and maintaining a common nuisance (controlled substances), one each.

Other drug crimes are classified as misdemeanors. Persons arrested in Ripley County for Class A: possession of a controlled substance, six; dealing in marijuana, and possession of paraphernalia with prior conviction, one each; Class B: possession of a device or substance used to interfere with a drug or alcohol screening, three; Class C: possession of paraphernalia, seven.

The rest of Ripley County felony charges between Aug. 1-Sept. 13: Level 4: burglary, two; Level 5: bribery, three; felon carrying a handgun, one; Level 6: obstruction of justice, five; operating a vehicle while intoxicated endangering a person less than 18, three; theft with prior conviction, invasion of privacy with prior conviction, and money laundering, two each; theft of a firearm, operating vehicle with ACE of .15 or more with passenger under 18 and defendant is at least 21, operating a vehicle while intoxicated with prior conviction, intimidation, check deception between $750 and $50,000, failure to register as a sex or violent offender, residential entry, criminal gang activity, and professional gambling (knowingly engages in pool-selling), one each.

More face misdemeanor charges: Class A: operating a vehicle while intoxicated endangering a person, eight; driving while suspended with prior, and driving while suspended with prior, six each; theft, five; operating a vehicle with blood alcohol concentration.15 or more, four; invasion of privacy, three; criminal trespass, two; public indecency, intimidation, and check deception under $750, one each; Class B: possession of ginseng by a dealer out of season, two; leaving the scene of an accident, criminal mischief, and public intoxication, one each; Class C: operating motor vehicle without ever receiving a license, six; use of private land without consent, two; illegal consumption of an alcoholic beverage (less than 18), operating a vehicle with BAC of .08 or more, public nudity, operate a vehicle with an altered interim (dealer) plate, and operating a vehicle without financial responsibility with prior, one each.

Sloppy – and sometimes dangerous – driving habits were the cause of 51 tickets for infractions handed out. Speeding got 30 in trouble.

The other infractions: no valid driver’s license, four; failure to use safety belt, three; operating with expired plates, operating a motor vehicle without financial responsibility, and unlawful possession of tobacco/minor in possession of tobacco/electronic cigarette, two each; workzone speeding with workers present, driving too fast for conditions, following too closely, failure to yield right of way to emergency vehicle, disregarding stop sign, federal motor carrier safety regulation violation, littering, and driving while suspended, one each.

One hundred thirty-four were arrested during that time period in Franklin County, with less serious felonies than in Ripley, according to https://public.courts.in.gov/mycase.

Alcohol is the biggest problem in this county with 33.6 percent, or 45 persons, stopped for related crimes. One is charged with a Level 6 felony for operating vehicle while intoxicated (prior conviction).

There were many more misdemeanors. Class A: operating vehicle with alcohol concentration equivalent to .15 or more, 11; operating a vehicle while intoxicated endangering a person, five; Class B: public intoxication, two; Class C: operating a vehicle while intoxicated, 10; operating vehicle with alcohol concentration equivalent to at least .08, but less than .15, nine; illegal consumption of an alcoholic beverage, five; illegal transport of alcoholic beverage on highway, one.

Forty of those arrests, or 29.8 percent, were because of drugs. Fourteen were detained for possession of marijuana, a Class B misdemeanor, more than the seven caught possessing meth, a Level 6 felony.

The other Franklin County drug felonies: Level 6: unlawful possession of syringe, four; possession of a narcotic drug, and maintaining a common nuisance (legend drugs), two each; dealing in marijuana (prior drug conviction), one.

Misdemeanor charges: Class A: possession of a controlled substance, one; Class B: possession of hash oil, two; Class C: possession of paraphernalia, five; operating vehicle with Schedule I or II controlled substance (or its metabolite) in person’s body, two.

The county’s other felony arrests during the past six weeks: Level 5: possession of child pornography, and escape where defendant runs away from lawful detention, one each; Level 6: operating vehicle after being habitual traffic offender, and neglect of a dependent, two each; resisting law enforcement, intimidation, and arson, one each.

Forty-one are facing misdemeanor counts: Class A: driving while suspended, eight; domestic battery and theft, three each; resisting law enforcement and criminal trespass, two each; carrying a handgun without a license, battery resulting in bodily injury, intimidation, operating a motorboat while license is suspended, and invasion of privacy, one each; Class B: disorderly conduct, seven; leaving the scene of an accident, three; criminal mischief, two; battery, false informing, and illegal taking of a wild animal (deer or wild turkey), one each; Class C: knowingly or intentionally operating motor vehicle without ever receiving a license, two; reckless driving, one.

Seven persons received tickets for infractions: speeding, failure of occupant to use safety belt, driving while suspended, possession of an alcoholic beverage, no operator’s license in possession, operating with expired plates, and operating boat without registration number.

Most were charged with one or two offenses, but these three went big: Phillip Mourey, Batesville, 19; Gabriel Seitz, Versailles, and Keith Craig II, Vevay, eight apiece. Some of these initial charges may be reduced later.

Debbie Blank can be contacted at debbie.blank@batesvilleheraldtribune.com or 812-717-3113.

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